Power Plant Information

E.W. Brown Station

  • E.W. Brown Station The Brown Plant, situated on the banks of Lake Herrington, showcases three types of electric generation.


  • Built in the 1920s, the Dix Dam Hydro Plant was a showplace filled with goldfish and flowers and hailed as the world's largest stone-filled dam. Originally a principal source of power, the hydro plant is now used mainly when heavy rainfall results in above normal lake elevation. Today, with all three units running, the plant produces 24 megawatts of power.


  • The bulk of electricity generated at Brown is coal-fired generation. Brown burns approximately 1.6 million tons of coal annually and has a capacity of more than 700 megawatts.


  • As a result of the new stricter Environmental Protection Agency's regulations, improvements will be made on Brown Unit 3 and the Brown ash pond will be converted to a dry storage landfill. Brown units 1 and 2 will continue to operate as always and the installation of additional emission controls will be deferred to get a clearer picture of pending federal environmental regulations.


  • The Brown plant also has a fleet of seven simple cycle natural gas combustion turbines.


  • During periods of high demand, the combustion turbines can be started and come to full load in just 30 minutes, versus the 10 hours needed to start up a coal-burning unit. The combustion turbine units use hot compressed gases to power the generator. Air is compressed and forced into a chamber where combustion takes place, producing gases of almost 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. These gases are forced to a turbine, which uses the energy to propel the generator and create electricity.


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    Cane Run Station
  • LG&E and KU announced in September 2011, that they plan to retire Cane Run, Green River and Tyrone due to the new, stricter federal Environmental Protection Agency's regulations.


  • In a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity filing with the Kentucky Public Service Commission September 15, the companies requested approval to build a 640-megawatt, natural gas combined cycle generating unit (NGCC) at Cane Run.

    Rendering of new unit (right side of image):
    Cane Run Station NGCC rendering


  • As outlined in the companies' 2011 Integrated Resource Plan, the NGCC is the least-cost method of generation.


  • As part of this project, the companies will be constructing an 8.1 mile, 20-inch natural gas pipeline on mostly existing rights of way.


  • The new unit needs to be operational by 2016, as that is the projected compliance date all operating plants must meet under certain new regulations.


  • The plant site in southwestern Louisville covers 510 acres.


  • Commercial operation began in 1954 in response to the demand for electricity by industries that located in Louisville during World War II. Three of its six units are now retired. Units 4, 5 and 6 have a net generating capacity of 563 megawatts.


  • Cane Run burns 1.6 million tons of coal per year, all of which is transported by rail.


  • Three units were retrofitted with scrubbers between 1976 and 1979. Cane Run Station meets the Clean Air Act's Phase II Standards for sulfur-dioxide emissions.


  • LG&E pioneered sulfur dioxide removal technology and helped develop and install one of the nation's first SO2 scrubbers in 1973. In 1979, then President Jimmy Carter visited Cane Run to learn about the operation of a coal-fired plant and see LG&E's scrubbers in action.


  • The company's first sludge-processing plant began operation in 1980 to serve Unit 6 and its scrubber. A similar waste processing plant for Units 4 and 5 and their scrubbers went into operation in 1981. A processing plant produces environmentally acceptable landfill material from flyash, lime and scrubber by-product.


  • In addition, Cane Run has a 15 megawatt combustion turbine on site.


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    Ghent Generating Station
  • GhentBegan commercial operation in 1973 with a net generating capacity of 1,932 megawatts.


  • One of the most environmentally sound and technologically advanced coal-fired generation plants in the nation. All of Ghent's generating units comply with the most stringent federal and state air, water, and waste regulations.


  • One of the largest coal-fired power plants in the LG&E and KU system, the units at Ghent's 1,700-acre site generate approximately 75% of KU's electricity-more than the company's other four coal-burning generating stations combined.


  • Each of the generating units is equipped with electrostatic precipitators designed to remove dust from the gas stream that results from burning coal. A network of monitoring systems on the three chimneys measures air quality to ensure compliance with environmental protection standards.


  • In late 1994, a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber system was installed at Ghent Unit #1 and reduced sulfur dioxide emissions by at least 90%-from approximately 80,000 tons per year to less than 8,000 tons per year. Beginning in 2004, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) equipment was installed on units 1, 3 and 4 to reduce NOx emissions.


  • And a recently completed, $600-millon FGD installation project resulted in all four units being equipped with FGDs.


  • In addition, as part of the recently announced environmental upgrades, fabric filter baghouse systems will be added for increased particulate and mercury control on all units at the Ghent generating station.


  • The Ghent Generating Station is looked upon as a leader among international utilities. Recognized as a low-cost, electric producer, Ghent Station plays host to a number of international utility professionals. Representatives from China, Russia, South Africa, and other countries have visited the plant to learn the secret to low-cost, power production. These visitors find that efficient management can run the station with less than 200 employees, minimum waste, and maximum production.


  • Each of Ghent's four generating units can produce enough electricity to light nearly five million, 100-watt light bulbs. The station consumes an average of 5.5 million tons of coal annually.


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    Green River Station
  • Green RiverAs recently announced, Green River, along with Cane Run and Tyrone generating stations, is slated to be retired in 2016 due to the new, stricter federal Environmental Protection Agency's regulations.


  • In a certificate of public convenience and necessity filing with the Kentucky Public Service Commission Sept. 15, the companies requested approval to build a 640-megawatt, natural gas combined cycle generating unit (NGCC) at Cane Run. In addition, the companies requested approval to purchase from Bluegrass Generation Company three additional simple-cycle natural gas combustion turbines located in LaGrange that will provide up to 495 megawatts of peak generation supply.


  • As outlined in the companies' 2011 Integrated Resource Plan, the NGCC is the least-cost method of generation. Consistent with previous disclosures, these two actions for replacement generation are expected to cost up to $800 million, of which approximately $110 million is for the Bluegrass plant.


  • Located on the banks of the Green River in western Kentucky, Green River is a four-unit, 263-megawatt coal-fired plant, that began commercial operation in 1950. Units 1 and 2 were retired January 1, 2002.


  • In 1974, more than 25 years ago, the company's first commercial scrubber was installed at the Green River Station to clean the emissions from Units 1 and 2. The scrubber removes over 90% of the sulfur dioxide from the flue gas associated with burning coal.


  • In 1995, low nitrogen oxide burners were installed that adjust the fire in the boilers to control the amount of NOx reduced. Unit 4 boiler has 16 low NOx burners that cut its emission rate almost in half, well below the environmental requirements.


  • A final guardian in the generating station's environmental efficiency is the continuous emission monitoring system which samples the chemical composition of flue gas as it leaves the stack, measuring both NOx and SO2 levels.


  • The coal handling facility at Green River transfers approximately 1,600 tons of coal from trucks to the plant daily. The station burns approximately 400,000 tons of western Kentucky coal each year.


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    Mill Creek Station
  • Mill CreekSitting on 544 acres in southwest Jefferson County, Mill Creek began commercial operation in 1972. The plant's net summer capacity is 1,472 megawatts.


  • All units are fully scrubbed, meeting the Clean Air Act's Phase II standards for sulfur-dioxide emissions.


  • Mill Creek was LG&E's first generating station to utilize cooling towers. Mechanical-draft cooling towers are installed on 3 of its 4 units to protect the Ohio River's aquatic life.


  • As part of the upcoming environmental improvements which are expected to begin in the spring of 2012, LG&E will spend approximately $1.3 billion to modernize the flue gas desulfurization systems, better known as scrubbers, and install fabric-filter bag house systems for increased particulate and mercury control on all units at the plant.


  • Mill Creek burns approximately 5 million tons of coal annually. Most coal was delivered in 100-ton railroad hopper cars until 1983, when the company's first permanent coal-barge unloading facility was constructed at the plant. This byproduct of the scrubber process which removes sulfur from the flue gases is synthetic gypsum, and Mill Creek has a gypsum processing plant on its property. The processing plant can dewater 1800 tons of gypsum per day. This material is shipped by truck to local producers and by barge as far away as as Missouri. The gypsum is used in the manufacturing of cement and drywall. A single barge carries enough gypsum to produce 60,000 sheets of drywall. Over 50 percent of the fly ash produced as another byproduct of the combustion of coal is used in the manufacturing of cement and concrete.


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    Ohio Falls Station
  • Ohio Falls StationBegan commercial operation in 1928. At that time, the station was the seventh-largest hydroelectric plant in the country.


  • The company is in the process of rehabilitating the facility's eight generating units.


  • Upon completion of the rehabilitation project, the facility's total generation capacity will be 100 megawatts.


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    Trimble County Station
  • Trimble County StationBegan commercial operation in December 1990, with a net generating capacity of 495 MW. Current generating capacity of 514 MW.


  • One of the most environmentally sound and technologically advanced coal-fired generation plants in the nation.


  • Its capacity increases the reliability of LG&E's electric service and boosts the company's ability to support economic expansion.


  • Its pollution-control equipment includes a high-efficiency electrostatic precipitator and a state-of-the-art wet limestone scrubber that removes more than 90 percent of the sulfur dioxide from the flue gas. The station's generating unit can operate only when the scrubber is running.


  • In compliance with Clean Air Act requirements for sulfur-dioxide removal for the year 2000.


  • Burns up to 200 tons per hour of coal which is transported in 1,500-ton barges.


  • The natural draft hyperbolic cooling tower provides efficient cooling of river water for reuse in the generation process.


  • Plant site includes a 114-acre wildlife preserve composed of wetlands and forested areas.


  • LG&E owns 75 percent of the 514-megawatt unit. The Illinois Municipal Electric Agency and Indiana Municipal Power Agency own the remaining 25 percent.


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    Trimble County 2
  • The company took operational control of TC2 in January 2011.


  • At the time, the $1.2 billion project was the largest construction project the company had ever undertaken.


  • It's the lowest cost generation in the company's fleet and thus the first unit's power dispatched to LG&E and KU customers.


  • Trimble County 2 earned a $125 million federal tax credit for the plant's environmental controls, a savings that is passed onto customers.


  • LG&E and KU own 75 percent of the 750-megawatt unit, the bulk of which was built to meet KU's growing energy demand. The Indiana Municipal Power Agency (IMPA) and Illinois Municipal Electric Agency (IMEA) own the remaining 25 percent of both units.


  • At its peak, approximately 3,200 individuals worked on the project, which is more than half the population of Bedford, Ky., where the plant is located. All total, construction of the project required 11.5 million man-hours.


  • The Trimble County plant site is also home to six gas combustion turbines, TC5-TC10, each with a nominal rating of 152-megawatts(912-megawatts total).

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    Tyrone Station and Haefling Combustion Turbine Station

  • TyroneTyrone Generating Station, built in 1947, was decommissioned in 2013 as a result of the new, stricter Environmental Protection Agency's regulations.


  • Tyrone is located on the Woodford County side of the Kentucky River between Versailles and Lawrenceburg in the famous "Palisades" district.


  • Employees from the Brown Station operated Tyrone and the Haefling Combustion Turbine units in Lexington. The three combustion units began operation in 1970 and contributed 54 megawatts to KU's system.



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    Natural Gas Compressor Stations

    Magnolia Compressor Station
    Magnolia Storage Area
    • Magnolia Storage AreaIncluded in the Magnolia Storage Area are three gas storage reservoirs, compressor station, gas processing plants, and high-pressure gas transmission lines associated with the operation of the gas storage and transmission system.


    Storage Reservoirs

    Magnolia Upper Storage Reservoir
    • Storage Capacity - 6.0 Billion Cubic Feet


    • Number of wells - 82 injection/withdrawal, 9 acres of observation wells


    • Storage Formation - Silurian Lego


    • Surface Area - 9,600


    • History - Magnolia Upper storage field was originally a gas production field converted by LG&E to a gas storage field. The storage field was placed into operation in 1958 and is located nearby the community of Magnolia in LaRue County, Kentucky. Portions of the storage field also lie in Green and Hart counties.


    Magnolia Deep Storage Field
    • Storage Capacity - 4.4 BCF


    • Number of wells - 53 injection/withdrawal, 16 observation wells


    • Storage Formation - Silurian Laurel


    • Surface Area - 9,600 acres


    • History - Magnolia Deep storage field lies directly beneath the Magnolia Upper storage field.


    Center Storage Field
    • Center Storage FieldStorage Capacity - 5.2 Billion Cubic Feet


    • Number of wells - 116 injection/withdrawal, 113 observation wells


    • Storage Formation - Silurian Laurel


    • Surface Area - 15,000 acres


    • History - Center Storage field was originally a gas production field that was converted to gas storage and placed into operation in 1966.


    Magnolia Compressor Station
    • Number of compressor units - 6 reciprocating


    • Total amount of compression horsepower - 8,010


    • Number of gas de-sulfurization processing units - 2


    • Number of gas dehydration processing units - 2


    • Total gas processing capacity of compressor station - 120 million cubic feet per day


    • Each gas reciprocating internal combustion engine stands 10 feet high, is 12 feet wide by 24 feet long and has either 10 or 12 power cylinders. Each engine drives 4 or 5 reciprocating compressors that compress gas withdrawn from storage. The engines are powered by natural gas.


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    Muldraugh Compressor Station
    Muldraugh Storage Area

    • Muldraugh Storage AreaIncluded in the Muldraugh Storage Area are two gas storage reservoirs, compressor station and gas processing plants, and high-pressure gas transmission lines associated with the operation of gas storage and transmission system.


    • LG&E purchases gas that is transported by either Texas Gas Transmission Corporation or by Tennessee Gas Pipeline, from the gas production areas in Texas, Louisiana and Gulf of Mexico. During the non-heating season, LG&E injects the gas into underground storage reservoirs. That gas is then drawn from the storage fields and delivered to LG&E's distribution system during the heating season. Additionally, gas is taken directly from Texas Gas and delivered to LG&E's distribution system. LG&E's gas storage allows LG&E to purchase gas more efficiently, by taking advantage of differences in gas prices between summer and winter.


    Storage Reservoirs

    Muldraugh Storage Reservoir
    • Storage Capacity - 4.6 Billion Cubic Feet


    • Number of wells - 52 injection/withdrawal, 6 observation wells


    • Storage Formation - Devonian Jeffersonville


    • Surface Area - 900 acres


    • History - Muldraugh storage field went into operation in 1931 and is recognized as one of the first gas storage reservoirs in the United States. The storage field was originally a gas production field located nearby the community of Muldraugh.


    Doe Run Storage Reservoir
    • Storage Capacity - 5.8 BCF


    • Number of wells - 84 injection/withdrawal, 8 observation wells


    • Storage Formation - Devonian Jeffersonville


    • Surface Area - 4,000 acres


    • History - Doe Run storage field went into operation in 1946 and is recognized as the first aquifer gas storage field in the nation. The storage formation was originally water saturated and LG&E injected gas into the formation displacing the water.


    Muldraugh Compressor Station
    • Muldraugh Compressor StationNumber of compressor units - 7 reciprocating compressors and 2 gas turbine compressor units


    • Total amount of compression horsepower - 9,545


    • Number of gas de-sulfurization processing units - 3


    • Number of gas dehydration processing units - 1


    • Total gas processing capacity of compressor station - 260 million cubic feet per day


    • Each gas reciprocating engine stands 10 feet high, is 12 feet wide by 20 feet long, and has 8 power cylinders that measure 18 inches across. Each engine drives 4 reciprocating compressors that compress gas withdrawn from storage. The engines are powered by natural gas.


    • Each gas turbine is rated at 1,250 horsepower and drives one centrifugal compressor that compresses gas withdrawn from storage. The gas turbines operate at 23,000 rpm and are powered by natural gas.



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    Neighbor to Neighbor
    Stay updated on the key activities at our generating stations across Kentucky.

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